Getting the most out of your air conditioning system

July has barely begun, but we’ve already been inundated with some very hot weeks in Alberta! Naturally, we’re doing lots of air conditioning repairs these days. But what if your air conditioning system works, but it doesn’t cool as well as you’d like? Here are some tips to maximize its effectiveness.

 

Change your cabin air filter.

Cabin what? We still run into a lot of people who won’t know their car has a cabin air filter! Your cabin air filter is the “furnace filter of your car”, filtering the air travelling through your heater vents. The effect a restricted filter can have on air conditioning cooling is dramatic! A plugged filter not only drastically reduces the force with which the air blows from the vents, but it also reduces cooling. Check out this vent temperature comparison we did on a vehicle with a very dirty cabin air filter:

air conditioning repair

We don’t charge any labour to replace cabin air filters on most vehicles, and we sell most vehicles’ filters for between $20 and $30!

 

Replace your climate-controlled seat filter.

Does your vehicle have air conditioned or cooled seats? Most of these have filters that require regular replacement as well. Check your owner’s manual on how often you should tend to them on your vehicle.

 

Turn your fan speed down.

As tempting as it may be to really get that cold air blasting, you’ll usually achieve a colder vent temperature at settings around three quarters of the way up your blower motor’s fan speed range. For example, this may be speed #4 of 5 settings. The faster the incoming air is moving, the less time it spends inside your vehicle’s evaporator core to be cooled, and too much air can overload the system on hot days.

 

Use your “recirculate” or “max A/C” setting.

car ac not cold

In one pass through the system, your air conditioning system can only cool the incoming air by so many degrees. By switching to your “recirculate” setting, you direct the system to pull air from inside the vehicle (which has already been cooled once) instead of outside. This dramatically reduces vent temperature on most vehicles. Just be careful on longer drives, because the air conditioning system also dries the air that passes through it. You’ll want to switch off the recirculation mode from time to time in order to avoid dry mouth or headaches.

 

Check your radiator for restrictions.

radiator replacement

For your A/C system to cool properly, it must be able to draw large amounts of air through the condenser mounted behind your vehicle’s front grille. Dirt and mud build-up on the front of the radiator and between your vehicle’s various coolers – very common on trucks – can really reduce this airflow. We’ve even seen where a customer forgot their “Saskatchewan thermostat” (piece of cardboard) behind the radiator after the winter ended! While we’re taking shots at our neighbors to the east, radiators plugged with bugs and grasshoppers are a real cooling issue in the prairies as well! Most of this debris can be washed out with a garden hose from the rear of the radiator. Be careful using a pressure washer; you’ll want to keep the angle of your spray perpendicular to the radiator or else you’ll bend the fins.

 

Have your air conditioning system recharged.

While a perfectly sealed air conditioning system should never get low on refrigerant – or “freon”, as we used to call it – the reality is that over the years, the refrigerant level may drop. Removing, measuring and topping up (or “recharging”) the refrigerant level can get your vehicle cooling like new again. This is something that should be left to a professional; see our post here on why you should not use store-bought “canned” refrigerant products. If your air conditioning system becomes low on charge after just one year or two, then it likely has a leak that should be repaired.

We charge between $140 and $180 for this service, on most vehicles.

 

Have any air conditioning system problems or concerns? Email us or give us a call!

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