The “extra warranty” you didn’t know your vehicle had!

airdrie exhaust catalytic converter

By Chris Dekker

 

This month, we had a 2011 Buick in the shop for a check engine light diagnosis. We determined that the car had a failed catalytic converter; not a cheap repair. We called the customer and informed them that while we’d love to replace their catalytic converter, we couldn’t charge them for something they could receive for free under warranty. “Warranty?” they said, “That thing has been off warranty for almost two years!”

While the customer was right – the powertrain warranty had long since expired – the catalytic converter was covered under a special, federally mandated emissions system warranty. American and Canadian laws state that car manufacturers must cover certain emissions system-related parts for 8 years, or 130,000 km. This list of parts includes:

  • The catalytic converter and any related shielding/protection.
  • The under-dash data link connector that is used with scan tools.
  • The “check engine” light bulb and related wiring.
  • The engine control module or computer (ECM, PCM, etc).
  • In addition to these parts, any other on-board computer that performs diagnostic functions related to the emission system must be covered. On some vehicles, this includes the Transmission Control Module, Fuel Pump Driver Module, and more.

While this is a fairly short list of parts, some of these items are very expensive components to replace, so it’s worth knowing about!

airdrie ecm pcm repair

 

Who can perform these warranty repairs?

Only a repair facility authorized by the vehicle manufacturer themselves can perform a no-charge repair under your emissions warranty. In most cases, this will only be the servicing dealership for that brand.

Can I be charged for any part of an emissions warranty repair?

No; it’s forbidden by law. While many dealerships will ask you to commit to a diagnostic charge up front, in case your problem isn’t actually being caused by one of the warrantable parts, they cannot charge you for this diagnosis once it is determined that a warrantable part has failed. You are not to be charged for the diagnosis, or any additional parts and/or supplies that are required to complete the repair. For example, if a catalyst replacement requires installation of new exhaust gaskets, pipes or clamps, you should not be charged for these items either.

Is there any way a dealership can deny an emissions warranty claim?

Yes – but only if they can prove that you have misused your vehicle or not maintained it correctly, and it is this abuse that caused the failure of the warrantable part. Some examples of these abuses include:

  • Vehicle abuse such as off-road driving or overloading.
  • Tampering with emissions system components, including removal; intentional damage; or disabling of any emissions parts. (This would include installation of many aftermarket performance parts; “chips”; or “programmers”.)
  • Improper maintenance, such as not following the manufacturer’s service schedules, or not using replacement parts that are equivalent to factory parts. For example, let’s pretend your owner’s manual states to replace your spark plugs at 100,000 km. If you bring your vehicle in with a failed catalytic converter at 120,000 km, and the original spark plugs still installed, it could be argued (and fairly so) that the worn-out spark plugs caused an engine running condition that damaged the catalytic converter.

What should you do if your claim is denied, and you’re sure it shouldn’t have been?

  1. Ask for a detailed explanation, in writing as to why emissions warranty coverage was denied; and
  2. Ask for the name(s) of the person(s) involved in the decision to deny coverage, including anyone from the manufacturer’s regional or zone office; and
  3. Ask for the name(s) of the person(s) with the manufacturer you should contact to appeal the denial of coverage under the emissions warranty.
  4. Contact the person mentioned above requesting coverage and giving the basis for your request. Repeat and continue the appeal process until you are satisfied or have exhausted all means of appeal. In Alberta, motorists can also reach out to the Alberta Motor Vehicle Industry Council (AMVIC) for help with any auto purchasing or service issues.

We hope this information is helpful, and we’d be happy to answer any questions you may have about new vehicle warranties – or anything else car-related! Please call or email us anytime.

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